3rd November 1913 (Monday)

BORN TODAY:

~In Cairo, Egypt – Albert Cossery, “Egyptian born French writer of Greek Orthodox Syro-Lebanese descent”, who described himself as a “Shawam”. He published his first work at age 27, and then “In 60 years he only wrote eight novels, in accordance with his philosophy of life in which “laziness” is not a vice but a form of contemplation and meditation” [Wikipedia].

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Cossery

~ In Sydney, Australia – The Workers Educational Association is established, “a movement founded to promote the higher education of working men and women”. Happy Centenary, WEA!

http://www.weasydney.com.au/

Labour Relations: In New Zealand, the Auckland Weekly News publishes photographs of squads of mounted “special constables” who, working with the regular police have, in recent days, recaptured the wharves and docks from striking miners.

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/auckland-wharves-during-1913-strike

Global finance: In the USA, for the first time ever, citizens receive information about the new national (federal) income tax. A married man living with his wife, who is in receipt of an income of $5,000 pays $10  (0.2%) a year and if his income is $10,000 he pays $60 per year (0.6%).

http://www.thepeoplehistory.com/november3rd.html

Society & Culture:

~ In Sydney, New South Wales, today’s front page of the Sydney Morning Herald consists of 10% news articles and 90% advertising.

~ In Ithica, New York, The “Cornell Daily News” reports a speech to the University by Mr E.C Mercer, who claims he has interviewed 45,000 undergraduates. He concludes that “there has been a marked improvement in the condition of all the great universities as regards excessive drinking and licentiousness”, and ascribes the improvement – in part at least – to the arrival of motion pictures.

~ In Copenhagen, Denmark, the Danish Postal Museum opens its door for the first time to share with the public the Head Postmaster’s collection of postal paraphernalia. ¬†Happy Centenary, Dansk Postmuseum!

http://dhistory.org/frontpages/35/1913/11/3/

http://cdsun.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/cornell?a=d&d=CDS19131103.2.5&e=——-en-20–1–txt-txIN——

http://www.ptt-museum.dk/en/about_the_museum/history_of_the_museum_/